Articles

BIO recognizes the importance of providing the fruits of science and innovation in healthcare for the benefit of all American citizens.

How is biotechnology going to change your company? How can you stay in step with—or leap ahead of—the competition by using biotech to cut costs and create new products?

The Biotechnology Industry Organization’s Industrial & Environmental (BIO I&E) Section can help you find the answers. We want to be your partner in navigating the complex, fluid world of industrial biotechnology.

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Sparked by aggressive ethanol mandates by the government, the debate over whether the U.S. can produce enough corn to meet the demand for both food and fuel continues to grow.

While a growing number of policy leaders support greater use of ethanol, some critics believe using agricultural feedstocks to produce biofuels creates competition "between the world's supermarkets and its service stations."

Biorefineries to produce advanced biofuels and biobased product require sustainable sources of cellulosic biomass. Adoption of no-till agriculture promises significant economic and environmental benefits for farmers while enabling them to provide cellulosic biomass from crop residues to these biorefineries.

Industrial biotechnology takes the biotech tools developed to fight disease and cure illness and applies them to the greatest challenges in industrial manufacturing, chemical synthesis, and renewable energy production.

Eighty-two percent of Americans are in favor of government support for the development of biofuels says a new survey released last week by BIO.

On Monday, April 10, during the BIO 2006 International Conference, BIO hosted a media brunch, "From Food to Fuel to Fashion: Industrial Biotech Does It All."

A comic-style explanation of Synthetic Biology that appeared in Nature.

There are many reasons why more biotech companies belong to BIO than to any other organization. Read on and you’ll see why.

Plant biotechnology contributes to sustainable agriculture by increasing food  production without harming or depleting the Earth’s limited natural resources.

In June 2003, the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO) brought its annual convention to Washington, D.C., setting the stage for an unprecedented exchange of views and expectations between biotechnology leaders and our nation’s top public officials.

For the United States and most developed nations, the foundation of prosperity has been the availability of abundant and affordable sources of energy.

The public has a strong interest in protecting research and research participants. Federal policy must find the right balance in protecting participants while allowing critical research to continue.

Has a member of your family been vaccinated against hepatitis B? Do you know someone who has diabetes? Has anyone in your family had heart disease?

Providers and policy makers must collectively address the profound effect the red-tape hassle can have on the practice of oncology.

Attached please find "Guidelines for BIO members engaging in Bioprospecting". The Guidelines are a set of general principles and practices that BIO, as an organization, believes are appropriate to follow when an entity engages in bioprospecting activities.

Guidelines for The Biotechnology Industry Organization Members Engaging in Bioprospecting

This document outlines BIO's principles on clinical trials.

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) are both strongly committed to expanding the role of biomass as an energy source.

The IES Marine Biotechnology interest group is comprised of educational institutions, research organizations, and private companies.