Advanced Biofuels

What happens in Washington influences biotechnology progress every bit as much as what happens on Wall Street or in the lab.

Sparked by aggressive ethanol mandates by the government, the debate over whether the U.S. can produce enough corn to meet the demand for both food and fuel continues to grow.

While a growing number of policy leaders support greater use of ethanol, some critics believe using agricultural feedstocks to produce biofuels creates competition "between the world's supermarkets and its service stations."

Biorefineries to produce advanced biofuels and biobased product require sustainable sources of cellulosic biomass. Adoption of no-till agriculture promises significant economic and environmental benefits for farmers while enabling them to provide cellulosic biomass from crop residues to these biorefineries.

Industrial biotechnology takes the biotech tools developed to fight disease and cure illness and applies them to the greatest challenges in industrial manufacturing, chemical synthesis, and renewable energy production.

Eighty-two percent of Americans are in favor of government support for the development of biofuels says a new survey released last week by BIO.

Ethanol produced from corn today amounts to about 2 percent of fuel sold in the United States, but Biotech scientists say that cellulosic ethanol can meet much more of America’s energy needs in the very near future.

This year car makers will offer car buyers a record number of new hybrid and alternative fueled vehicles. 

Has a member of your family been vaccinated against hepatitis B? Do you know someone who has diabetes? Has anyone in your family had heart disease?

For the United States and most developed nations, the foundation of prosperity has been the availability of abundant and affordable sources of energy.

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) are both strongly committed to expanding the role of biomass as an energy source.

The report was prepared for the National Commission on Energy Policy (NCEP) by the Role of Biomass in America's Energy Future (RBAEF) project. It asserts that the United States "can replace much of our oil with biofuels - fuels made from plant materials grown by American farmers. These fuels, especially those known as cellulosic biofuels, can be cost-competitive with gasoline and diesel."

Industrial biotechnology is creating new markets for traditional agricultural crops and crop residues as renewable feedstocks, chemical intermediates, and energy sources.

Letters, Testimony & Comments

July 27 2015
The Biotechnology Industry Organization (“BIO”) is pleased to have the opportunity today to comment on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (“EPA’s”) recently published proposed rule titled “Renewable Fuel Standard Program: Standards for 2014, 2015, and 2016 and Biomass Based Diesel Volume for 2017.”    
May 8 2015
The Biotechnology Industry Organization (“BIO”) is pleased to have the opportunity today to comment on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (“EPA”) Proposed Rule on the 2014 Standards for the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) PrograM (“the proposed rule”) and the renewable volume obligations (RVO) for biofuels in 2014.
December 1 2014
On March 31, 2014, the Biotechnology Industry Organization (“BIO”) sends letter to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (“EPA”) expressing concerns with the Agency's decision to halt its petition process for new renewable fuel pathways.
October 29 2014
RE: Proposed 2014 RFS Volumetric Blending Requirements On behalf of the more than 35 advanced biofuel companies listed below, we are writing to express our concern about a recently release drafted of the proposed 2014 RFS volumetric blending requirement. While the official proposed rule has not been released, it is clear that a number of key issues are under consideration at the present time.
September 23 2014
Inaction on the 2014 RFS regulatory rule will lead to increased GHG emissions of 21 million metric tons CO2 equivalent. The increased GHG emissions are equal to putting an additional 4.4 million cars on the road or opening 5.5 new coal-fired power plants. The “blend wall” should not be a consideration for setting the RFS, because the United States is using more transportation fuel in 2014 than previously projected.

Press Releases

November 30 2015
The final rule for the 2014, 2015 and 2016 Renewable Fuel Standards (RFS), issued today by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), is an unnecessary, unlawful about face for a program that was successfully driving development of cleaner biofuel technologies and reduction of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. The rule undermines the goals of the statute, and it will continue to undercut investment in advanced and cellulosic biofuels and increase greenhouse gas emissions in the transportation fuel sector, BIO said today.
August 24 2015
At its tenth anniversary, the Renewable Fuel Standard's requirement to substitute biofuels for fossil fuels has displaced nearly 1.9 billion barrels of foreign oil and reduced associated carbon emissions by 589.3 million metric tons.
July 27 2015
BIO’s comments make clear that if the agency does not correct its course on the program, it will continue to undermine the goals and requirements of the statute, undercut investment in advanced and cellulosic biofuels, and raise greenhouse gas emissions in the transportation fuel sector.
June 1 2015
BIO  thanks Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack for making available grants to states that invest in expanding infrastructure for biofuels.
May 29 2015
EPA has again proposed rules for the Renewable Fuel Standard that will continue to chill investment in the advanced biofuel sector and increase climate changing emissions.