Publications

BIO and the Association of Biotechnology Led Enterprises (ABLE) have released a new report, entitled Accelerating Growth: Forging India’s Bioeconomy, which present recommendations in support the growth of the country’s bioeconomy.

Using an input output “I-O” approach to estimating the economic impact of academic licensing, and summing over the 15 years of available data for academic U.S. AUTM Survey respondents, the total contribution of these academic licensors to gross industry output ranges from $199B to $836B, in 2005 $US Dollars; contributions to GDP range from $86B to $388B, in 2005 $US Dollars.

This report examines the role played by IPRs in both upstream and downstream phases of the research, development and commercialization of biotechnology products and provides a review and analysis of the existing body of knowledge concerning the role of IPRs.

At a time when the global economy struggles to recover from a severe recession and uncertainty remains regarding future economic growth, bioscience industry development is generating significant attention both globally and at home.

Successful multi-sector global health programs engage partners and policymakers early, communicate openly and frequently with relevant stakeholders, and empower and involve communities, according to a website relaunched this week, Case Studies for Global Health.

BIO Ventures for Global Health (BVGH) and the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO) have collaborated on a new report that builds upon the findings in BVGH’s previous analysis, Developing New Drugs and Vaccines for Neglected Diseases of the Poor: The Product Developer Landscape.

A strong Network will bolster public awareness of the industry and encourage more investment dollars.

The U.S. bioscience industry continued to score employment gains through 2008 - the first year of the recent economic downturn, according to a study released today by Battelle and the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO).

Biotechnology is all around us and is already a big part of our lives, providing breakthrough products and technologies to combat disease, reduce our environmental footprint, feed the hungry, and make useful products.

This report presents the estimates of the significant financial contributions of the biotechnology industry to the U.S. economy and to revenues collected by the federal, state and local governments.

We have used the biological processes of microorganisms for 6,000 years to make useful food products, such as bread and cheese, and to preserve dairy products.

Today, the biotechnology industry is enjoying more success and influence than ever before. Our industry’s innovations continue to improve the lives of people worldwide, and the advancement of these innovations is supported by the work of BIO.

States and regions throughout the United States are investing to create a business climate that supports the specific needs of the biosciences sector.

Biotechnology, the combination of biology and technology, includes biologic applications, diagnostic tools and businesses that improve everyday life by providing solutions to some of life's most vexing problems.

What happens in Washington influences biotechnology progress every bit as much as what happens on Wall Street or in the lab.

In June 2003, the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO) brought its annual convention to Washington, D.C., setting the stage for an unprecedented exchange of views and expectations between biotechnology leaders and our nation’s top public officials.

Plant biotechnology contributes to sustainable agriculture by increasing food  production without harming or depleting the Earth’s limited natural resources.

There are many reasons why more biotech companies belong to BIO than to any other organization. Read on and you’ll see why.

Has a member of your family been vaccinated against hepatitis B? Do you know someone who has diabetes? Has anyone in your family had heart disease?

Providers and policy makers must collectively address the profound effect the red-tape hassle can have on the practice of oncology.

Industrial biotechnology is creating new markets for traditional agricultural crops and crop residues as renewable feedstocks, chemical intermediates, and energy sources.

As people age they walk a minefield of life-threatening and debilitating diseases.