Organs-on-a-Chip and AI: Realizing Potential Efficiencies in Drug Discovery and Development

[Available On-Demand]
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The shortcomings of animal disease models are well known. More than 90% of drugs fail in early human testing because safety and efficacy results from animal tests do not always predict drug performance in humans. The impact is especially devasting when these failings are not discovered until the drug is fully launched. New technologies like AI and “organs on a chip,” using healthy and patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells to create ready-to-use assay plates containing living microtissues, could soon redefine the preclinical landscape by significantly reducing the need for animal testing and improving the accuracy and efficiency of early drug development. This panel will explore how these highly scalable new technologies could deliver significant cost and time savings to the pharmaceutical industry, reduce animal testing, and potentially lead to safer, more effective human clinical trials.
Moderator
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Associate Director, National Toxicology Program; Scientific Director, Division of NTP
NIH
Speakers
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• Director, Translational Cell Sciences, Stem Cells and Genomic Engineering
Biogen
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Senior Advisor, Toxicology
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration
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CEO, Co-Founder
Atomwise, Inc.
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Co-founder and CEO
StemoniX