A third vaccine candidate with promising data

January 15, 2021
We’re ending the week with promising news from Johnson & Johnson and another look at the potential for biotechnology to boost our food supply and the economy. Enjoy the long weekend. (784 words, 3 minutes, 55 seconds) Good Day BIO is taking a break on Monday, January…
BIO

We’re ending the week with promising news from Johnson & Johnson and another look at the potential for biotechnology to boost our food supply and the economy. Enjoy the long weekend. (784 words, 3 minutes, 55 seconds)

Good Day BIO is taking a break on Monday, January 18, in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day. We will resume publication on Tuesday, January 19.

 

A third vaccine candidate with promising data

 
 

In case you missed this news: Early data from Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine trials show the one-shot vaccine creates an immune response, the company announced yesterday

The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson published interim data on the phase 1/2a clinical trial of the company’s COVID-19 vaccine candidate. 

What they found: The vaccine “induced an immune response and was generally well-tolerated across all study participants,” producing neutralizing antibodies “after a single vaccination” in participants aged 18-55. 

What’s next: Data on patients over age 65, as well as phase 3 data, is expected in late January. 

The vaccine uses established technology, leveraging the company’s “AdVac® vaccine platform, which was also used to develop and manufacture Janssen’s European Commission-approved Ebola vaccine regimen and construct its Zika, RSV, and HIV investigational vaccine candidates,” continues the press release

And it could help speed up vaccination around the world, including in less-developed countries. It’s just one dose and remains stable for “at least three months at 35-46° F, which is about the temperature of your home refrigerator,” explained Dr. Mathai Mammen, Global Head of Janssen R&D. “We believe this stability will help make it easier to transport and distribute our COVID-19 vaccine candidate without the need for shipping at special temperatures.” 

For the latest news on the COVID-19 pipeline, visit BIO’s COVID-19 Therapeutic Development Tracker.

 

More Health Care News:

Biopharma Dive: 5 questions facing the FDA in 2021
Challenges ahead include a new commissioner, a heavy coronavirus workload, adapting clinical trial design, regulation of genetic medicines, and PDUFA VII.

 
 
 
Twitter
 
LinkedIn
 
Facebook
 
 
Sponsored Content
Spread facts!
What is a vaccine? How are vaccines developed? How do we know the COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective? We answer these questions and more at www.CovidVaccineFacts.org. Visit to spread facts and combat misinformation in this critical time.
 

Biotech holds great promise for food and the economy—if we let it

 
 

As we reported yesterday, biotechnology is one of our best defenses against food insecurity, which has been rising during the COVID-19 pandemic. But to reap the many health, economic, and environmental benefits of it, we need to modernize regulations.

From vegetables and plant-based proteins that have a longer shelf life, to crops and food animals resistant to disease, pests, and rising temperatures, “innovations in food production could be the best defense” against food insecurity, says Nasdaq.

This could be a huge opportunity for economic growth, too: “A report from the McKinsey Global Institute suggests biological innovation in agriculture, aquaculture, and food production fields could generate economic returns of up to $1.2 trillion over the next 10-20 years,” Nasdaq continues. “That would increase the overall value of the global food and agribusiness industry by more than 20%.”

Still, GMOs and gene edited products face “uphill battles,” including bans throughout Europe and regulatory barriers in the United States. (For example, to date, only two food animals have been approved in the U.S.—one being AquaBounty’s sustainable salmon—and crop regulation needs modernization.)

But for the health of the planet and the economy, this needs to change. Gene editing has potential to "reap big benefits for both human health and the health of our environment," as Innovature put it. Now, it's time for smart, science-driven policy around the world that recognizes this. 

 

More Agriculture and Environment News: 

Biofuels International: Volkswagen switches two car-carriers to biofuel
“Supplied by Netherlands-based GoodFuels, the fuel is produced from materials such as used oil from restaurants and the food industry.” 

NASA: 2020 tied for warmest year on record, NASA analysis shows
“Earth’s global average surface temperature in 2020 tied with 2016 as the warmest year on record, according to an analysis by NASA.”

Reuters: U.S. EPA eyes extending refinery biofuel deadlines, no action on waivers
"The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said on Thursday it would propose to extend deadlines for refiners to prove compliance with biofuel laws, but signaled it would not decide on a slew of pending waiver requests submitted by the industry."

 
 
 
Twitter
 
LinkedIn
 
Facebook
 
 
BIO Beltway Report
BIO Beltway Report
 
Paragraph (sm) - Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Quis ipsum suspendisse ultrices gravida. Risus commodo viverra maecenas accumsan lacus vel facilisis sample link.
 

President Trump’s Friday: Ahead of his final weekend in office, “President Trump will work from early in the morning until late in the evening. He will make many calls and have many meetings,” says the official schedule. 

President-elect Biden’s Friday: CNN explains what’s in Biden’s $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief package. The transition team announced several more appointments, including:

  • Former FDA Commissioner David Kessler to head Operation Warp Speed
  • Christen Linke Young for deputy director of the Domestic Policy Council for Health and Veterans Affairs (previously deputy secretary for the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services)
  • Several senior advisers to the Office of Domestic Climate Policy, including Sonia Aggarwal for climate policy and innovation (co-founder of Energy Innovation), and David Hayes as a special assistant to the president on climate policy (currently executive director of the State Energy & Environmental Impact Center)
  • Cecilia Martinez as senior director for environmental justice for the White House Council on Environmental Quality (previously co-founder and executive director of the Center for Earth, Energy, and Democracy)

What’s Happening on Capitol Hill: An update on timing, from The New York Times Evening Briefing: “It’s all but certain that the [impeachment] trial will take place after he leaves office next Wednesday. But the House speaker…may wait to send it to the Senate. That would give the Senate time to put Mr. Biden’s national security team in place.” Meanwhile, at least four Members of Congress have tested positive for COVID-19 following the U.S. Capitol riot.

 
 
Paragraph (normal) - Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Quis ipsum suspendisse ultrices gravida. Risus commodo viverra maecenas accumsan lacus sample link.
 
Twitter
 
LinkedIn
 
Facebook