An update on low-carbon fuel standards in the states

February 9, 2021
For your Tuesday, we have an update on efforts to enact policies to expand sustainable fuels in key states. BIO’s Dr. Michelle explains how COVID-19 vaccines were developed so quickly. And, meet the Nigerian agricultural economist who has helped millions of farmers…
BIO

For your Tuesday, we have an update on efforts to enact policies to expand sustainable fuels in key states. BIO’s Dr. Michelle explains how COVID-19 vaccines were developed so quickly. And, meet the Nigerian agricultural economist who has helped millions of farmers across Africa. (790 words, 3 minutes, 57 seconds)

 

An update on low-carbon fuel standards in the states

 
 

As we reported one month ago, BIO expects efforts to tackle climate change to be at the top of statehouse agendas—and biofuels provide a readily available solution. Here’s an update on efforts to enact policies to expand sustainable fuels in key states.

New Mexico: A low-carbon fuel standard (LCFS) is moving through the Senate. As we reported, it’s a top priority of Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham, giving it a better-than-average chance of passing.

New York: The State Assembly is considering legislation establishing an LCFS. While the LCFS did not make it into Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s budget, BIO is working with lawmakers and stakeholders to include it in the Senate budget. The state constitution requires the budget to be approved by April 1.

Washington State: As previously reported, Gov. Jay Inslee proposed a low-carbon fuel standard in his 2021-2023 budget. The House Appropriations Committee is expected to vote on the bill in mid-February. Then, the bill will go to the House floor and the Senate. The legislation remains a priority of the Democratic caucus, which controls the State Legislature—giving the measure its best chance of passing since it was first considered four years ago.

Watch Minnesota. The Legislature is expected to drop a bill soon requiring the use of gasoline blended with 15% ethanol (E15). If passed, Minnesota would be the first state to enact such a law. 

Learn more about sustainable biofuels.

 

More Agriculture and Environment News:


The New York Times: Climate change lengthening pollen season in U.S., study shows
“[T]he combination of warming air and higher levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has caused North American pollen seasons since 1990 to start some 20 days earlier, on average, and to have 21% more pollen.”

 
 
 
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BIO Celebrates Black History Month
Akinwumi Adesina.jpg

Nigerian agricultural economist Dr. Akinwumi Adesina won the 2017 World Food Prize for leading major policy change that’s helped millions of African farmers and improved nutrition across the continent. 

He organized the 2006 African Fertilizer Summit, “one of the largest high-level meetings in history to focus on Africa’s food issues,” says the World Food Prize Foundation. This led to the creation of the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA), a partnership with the Rockefeller Foundation and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, where he “played a major role...in convincing banks to invest in agriculture and working to directly connect farmers to markets—a multi-pronged strategy designed to greatly diminish rural poverty and create wealth and stability in the agriculture sector.”

As Nigeria’s minister of agriculture, Dr. Adesina empowered 14.5 million farmers—including 2.5 million women—by implementing an “e-wallet” system to provide vouchers for fertilizer and seeds directly to farmers’ mobile phones, allowing them to “significantly increase the quality and quantity of the crops they planted.” 

Since 2015, Dr. Adesina has served as president of the African Development Bank, where he works to end malnutrition and stunting.

 

Big lessons from the rapid development of COVID-19 vaccines

 
 

Two COVID-19 vaccines are making their way into the arms of patients across the country and a few more are on the way, thanks to biopharmaceutical companies “devoting unprecedented time and capital to the effort,” writes BIO President and CEO Dr. Michelle McMurry-Heath in Issues & Insights. She explains how this happened so quickly—and why you can trust the process. 

“Biopharmaceutical researchers can deliver a safe and effective vaccine faster than ever because of intense industry collaboration and decades of private-sector innovation,” says Dr. Michelle.

“Many Americans are justifiably questioning this timeline,” she continues. “But there are several key reasons why the biopharma industry has mobilized so quickly.”

Do you have questions about vaccine R&D? Visit www.COVIDVaccineFacts.org to get answers. 

“For starters, the industry has leveraged novel technologies to identify promising vaccine candidates faster, which ultimately streamlines development and testing,” she explains.

Furthermore, COVID-19 vaccines have been “decades in the making,” thanks to “billions of dollars of private investment and years of hard work.”

We can also credit “unprecedented levels of public-private-sector collaboration,” on everything from developing government guidance on critical R&D decisions, to finding enough clinical trial participants. 

“Rest assured: researchers and their government partners are not sacrificing safety for speed in the race for a COVID-19 vaccine,” she concludes.

Read the whole thing. 

Want to know more about the COVID-19 pipeline? Check out BIO’s COVID-19 Therapeutic Development Tracker.

 
 
 
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BIO Beltway Report
BIO Beltway Report
 
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President Biden’s Tuesday: POTUS, VP Harris, and Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen will meet with business leaders to discuss COVID-19 recovery. Vogue profiled new CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky

What’s Happening on Capitol Hill: Former President Trump’s second impeachment trial begins today in the Senate. Meanwhile, the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee is expected to advance EPA nominee Michael Regan but the timing on a final floor vote is unclear, according to Politico. And, House Democrats are using budget reconciliation to “fast-track” President Biden’s COVID-19 relief package, reports NBC; we’ll be watching and reporting relevant updates. 

 
 
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