Beating COVID-19 will change how new therapies are developed

May 27, 2020
Today we’re taking a look at some of the cool things biotech researchers are doing—from getting important new therapies to patients for COVID-19 and other diseases, to tracking endangered species. Here are about 750 words, just under 4 minutes.
BIO

Today we’re taking a look at some of the cool things biotech researchers are doing—from getting important new therapies to patients for COVID-19 and other diseases, to tracking endangered species. Here are about 750 words, just under 4 minutes.

Beating COVID-19 will change how new therapies are developed

That’s the message from a biotech CEO and a biotech VC in a new op-ed in STAT News

While there’s no silver lining to the pandemic, it’s nonetheless driving “an unprecedented transformation of the global medical research ecosystem,” explains John Crowley, CEO of Amicus Therapeutics (BIO member!) and Kush Parmar, managing partner at 5AM Ventures and one of the founding partners of the COVID R&D partnership. 

“Cutting-edge medical research and data are being shared and analyzed in near real time,” in an effort to find COVID-19 vaccines, treatments, and diagnostics as quickly as possible. 

We’re also breaking down “silos between medical research and patient care,” leading to an “adaptive research network that can harness the latest findings from patients treated in frontline settings and use that experience to help select and test the most promising new therapies and vaccines in clinical trials.” 

Three important tools are reducing R&D time and cost: “modernized regulatory science, digital medicine technologies, and adaptive clinical trial designs.” 

These shifts will not only help us get out of this crisis—they’re also “making the future of medicine a reality today.” And after the pandemic, will help us beat other illnesses and save millions more lives, too. 

Read the whole thing. 

Learn more about what the biotech industry’s doing to combat COVID-19 at www.bio.org/coronavirus.

 

More Health Care News:

The Wall Street Journal: Race is on to create rapid COVID-19 tests for the fall
“Hundreds of teams are competing a la ‘Shark Tank’ for NIH funding to develop at-home diagnostic strips and other options.”

Biopharma Dive: Merck makes COVID-19 drug plans clear with flurry of deals
“The two experimental vaccines come by way of Themis, an Austrian biotech Merck is acquiring, and the nonprofit IAVI, with which Merck will collaborate. Clinical trials of the two candidates will begin later this year, Merck said. The pharma also bought rights to an oral antiviral drug from privately held Ridgeback Biotherapeutics.” 

 
Twitter
 
LinkedIn
 
Facebook
 

How CRISPR can be used for conservation

The University of California-Davis has published a new study showing how gene editing can be used as a tool for conservation of endangered fish and “revolutionize environmental monitoring.” Let’s dive in.

It’s an amazing tool for health, agriculture, and the environment—allowing scientists to do everything “from growing disease-resistant crops to, more recently, a diagnostic test for the virus that causes COVID-19,” says ScienceDaily. (Innovature has covered a lot of the cool things we might be able to do with CRISPR, like saving bananas and preventing the spread of malaria.)

But wait, what’s CRISPR? It’s gene editing technology that allows scientists to make small, precise edits to an organism’s own genome, much faster than traditional breeding techniques. 

And it could be used for conservation and resource management, too, by using it to “rapidly detect and differentiate among species,” explains ScienceDaily.

In the study, researchers were able to “genetically distinguish” endangered Delta smelt from other fish species that look exactly alike, “with no need to extract DNA.”

They think this could be used for other species, too—enabling researchers to confirm “species at crime scenes, in the animal trade at border crossings, for monitoring poaching, and for other animal and human health applications.”

“CRISPR can do a lot more than edit genomes,” said study co-author Andrea Schreier. “It can be used for some really cool ecological applications, and we’re just now exploring that.”

Read the full article here.

 
Twitter
 
LinkedIn
 
Facebook
 
BIOTECHNOLOGY: BEYOND IMAGINATION

MaxCyte: Developing Cell Therapies to Treat the Rarest of Diseases

MaxCyte: Developing Cell Therapies to Treat the Rarest of Diseases
Paragraph (normal) - Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Quis ipsum suspendisse ultrices gravida. Risus commodo viverra maecenas accumsan lacus sample link.
 
 

About half of the 300 million people who live with a rare disease, like autoimmune disorders and cancers, do not have any treatment options.  

Cell therapy is promising—but comes with a lot of challenges. 

That’s where MaxCyte comes in. The company developed its ExPERT™️ cell-engineering technology so biopharmaceutical researchers can work with nearly all cell types to improve the drug development process—including efficiency, efficacy, and speed.

Click here to watch and learn more.

 
BIO Beltway Report
GoodDayBIO
 
 

President Trump’s Wednesday: Meeting with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo at the White House, then heading to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida to watch the SpaceX launch. Also, he’s getting fact-checked by Twitter now.

What’s Happening on Capitol Hill: The House is back in session, though there’s been a lot of kerfuffle about whether that’s even a good idea and whether Speaker Pelosi should allow proxy voting. Two virtual hearings will focus on COVID-19: House Ways and Means on the disproportionate impact on communities of color, and House Veterans Affairs on veterans’ disability during the pandemic. The Senate is not in session.

 
 
Paragraph (normal) - Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Quis ipsum suspendisse ultrices gravida. Risus commodo viverra maecenas accumsan lacus sample link.
 
Twitter
 
LinkedIn
 
Facebook