Tackle climate change, create jobs, preserve innovation

February 12, 2021
To close out the week, we explain the Biden administration’s new climate working group and how to protect America’s innovation ecosystem. And because it’s almost Valentine’s Day, we recognize the Black inventor who has saved hundreds of thousands of hearts. (892 words,…
BIO

To close out the week, we explain the Biden administration’s new climate working group and how to protect America’s innovation ecosystem. And because it’s almost Valentine’s Day, we recognize the Black inventor who has saved hundreds of thousands of hearts. (892 words, 4 minutes, 27 seconds)

Good Day BIO is taking a break on Monday, February 15, for Presidents Day. We will resume normal publication on Tuesday, February 16.

 

How the administration plans to tackle climate change and create jobs

 
 

BIO has long championed the advancement of biotechnologies to tackle climate change, create jobs, and build resiliency—and yesterday, the Biden administration announced a plan that would aim to do that.

Yesterday, the Biden-Harris administration announced “an ambitious innovation effort to create American jobs while tackling the climate crisis.” 

This includes the launch of a Climate Innovation Working Group, which will “help coordinate and strengthen federal government-wide efforts” on reaching net-zero emissions by 2050 and building resiliency.

The administration outlined key planks of the working group’s agenda, which includes “new, sustainable fuels for aircraft and ships,” as well as “innovative soil management, plant biologies, and agricultural techniques to remove carbon dioxide from the air and store it in the ground.”

Hey, this sounds familiar…BIO has long championed the advancement of biotechnologies to increase sustainable agriculture and sustainable fuels. Here are a few examples:

Where will they start? The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced $100 million in funding to support “transformational low-carbon energy technologies.”

 

More Agriculture and Environment News: 

AP: What the WHO coronavirus experts learned in Wuhan
“The mission to Wuhan did not change a major theory about where the virus came from. Scientists think bats are the most likely carriers, and that they passed it on to another animal, which passed it on to humans.”

AGree Climate, Food + Ag Dialogue: The Role of Federal Policy at the Nexus of Climate, Food, and Water
"There is no silver bullet to address climate change. Complementary policies are needed that reduce emissions, assist farmers in reducing agricultural risk and improving productivity and profitability, and create additional benefits for habitat, water quality, and soil health."

 
 
 
Twitter
 
LinkedIn
 
Facebook
 
 
BIO Celebrates Black History Month
Otis Boykin.jpg

Ahead of Valentine’s Day, we’re thinking about hearts—and the Black inventor and electronics pioneer Otis Boykin, who invented the control unit for the pacemaker.

Born in 1920, Boykin graduated from Fisk University and began a job testing automatic aircraft controls. He was accepted to a graduate program at the Illinois Institute of Technology but could not complete his degree because he could not afford the tuition.

But Boykin was “undeterred,” writes MIT—and he pursued a career in the emerging field of electronics. He earned more than 25 patents, including for the electrical resistor in the control unit of the pacemaker, which allowed it to precisely regulate a person’s heartbeat. In addition to the pacemaker, Boykin’s inventions have been used in everything from consumer electronics to guided missiles. 

Boykin died from heart failure in 1982.

 

Why we must preserve and protect Bayh-Dole

 
 

This week, the Bayh-Dole Coalition submitted a white paper to President Biden explaining the long-lasting impact of the Bayh-Dole Act and urging his administration to preserve and protect this important legislation. Here’s what you need to know.

What’s Bayh-Dole again? In a nutshell, the bipartisan Patent and Trademark Law Amendments Act (a.k.a. Bayh-Dole):

  • Empowers universities, small businesses, and non-profit institutions to take ownership of inventions made with federally funded research, so they can license these inventions for further applied R&D and broader public use.
  • Encourages the private-sector investment needed to turn basic government-funded biomedical research into tested and approved products that benefit patients, requires these products to be manufactured domestically, and ensures royalties for universities to further advance basic research and education.

It’s “spurred decades of public-private sector collaboration,” says Bayh-Dole Coalition Executive Director Joseph P. Allen, including $1.7 trillion in U.S. economic output, 6 million jobs, and around 300 drugs on the market.

And it’s more important than ever during the COVID-19 pandemic, because it “helped set the stage for the public-private partnerships that are essential to developing a vaccine and effective treatments against the novel coronavirus,” explained the law’s co-author Sen. Bob Dole (R-KS) in Roll Call.  

The white paper explains how the Biden administration can stay true to the law’s intent and protect America’s robust innovation ecosystemread the whole thing.

“The Biden administration should uphold the precedent set by past administrations, both Democratic and Republican, that rejects using Bayh-Dole’s march-in provision as a government price-setting mechanism for successfully commercialized inventions,” continued Allen. “Senators Bayh and Dole did not intend for the legislation’s march-in provision to be used as a price control. Abusing this provision would upend the research, development, and commercialization system that supports millions of U.S. jobs and makes America the world’s most innovative nation.”

For more information on Bayh-Dole and why it matters, visit bayhdolecoalition.org or check out our infographic.

 
 
 
Twitter
 
LinkedIn
 
Facebook
 
 
BIO Beltway Report
BIO Beltway Report
 
Paragraph (sm) - Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Quis ipsum suspendisse ultrices gravida. Risus commodo viverra maecenas accumsan lacus vel facilisis sample link.
 

President Biden’s Friday: Meeting with bipartisan governors and mayors to discuss COVID-19 relief, lunch with the veep, and receiving an economic briefing from Treasury Secretary Yellen before heading to Camp David.

What’s Happening on Capitol Hill: The impeachment trial continues in the Senate. In the House, committees are finishing up the budget reconciliation process on the coronavirus relief package; the $1.9 trillion package is expected to be assembled next week, per POLITICO Day Ahead.

 
 
Paragraph (normal) - Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Quis ipsum suspendisse ultrices gravida. Risus commodo viverra maecenas accumsan lacus sample link.
 
Twitter
 
LinkedIn
 
Facebook